Camera

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The Camera is easy enough to get a conceptual grasp of. Its a camera, isn't it?

In a camera tracking scenario, it is important to ensure that the properties of Nuke's camera match those of the real world camera and also any camera in any 3D app which you are using. This is a vital part of the compositing workflow.

A camera can also be used as a projector. See Project3D for a simple example of its use.

Tip: animating a camera is sometimes easier if its pivot is defined by an Axis node. The snippet below shows an example of its use.

Press 'Expand' and select and copy everything below this line, then paste into the Nuke node graph.

set cut_paste_input [stack 0]
version 9.0 v7
BackdropNode {
inputs 0
name AXIS
tile_color 0x87854701
gl_color 0x87854701
label "AXIS...\n\nSupplying the \ncamera motion"
note_font "Arial Black"
note_font_size 20
selected true
xpos -8670
ypos -754
bdwidth 181
bdheight 246
}
push $cut_paste_input
Axis2 {
rotate {0 {curve x1 0 l x200 90} 0}
name Axis1
selected true
xpos -8613
ypos -587
}
Camera2 {
translate {3.064146996 5.43742609 8.786061287}
rotate {-31.67805537 20.19994296 0}
name Camera4
selected true
xpos -8613
ypos -426
}
CheckerBoard2 {
inputs 0
name CheckerBoard2
selected true
xpos -8458
ypos -581
}
Sphere {
selectable false
name Sphere2
selected true
xpos -8458
ypos -477
}
push 0
ScanlineRender {
inputs 3
conservative_shader_sampling false
motion_vectors_type distance
name ScanlineRender5
selected true
xpos -8458
ypos -405
}
Write {
name Write4
selected true
xpos -8458
ypos -381
}
StickyNote {
inputs 0
name StickyNote10
label Animated!
note_font "Verdana Bold Bold"
note_font_size 20
selected true
xpos -8426
ypos -638
}